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Finding rebates for furnaces and air conditioners

Buying a furnace or air conditioner? Save twice if you upgrade to efficient heating and cooling.
By Rhea Seymour
3.97826

A new furnace or central air conditioner is a hefty investment. But some costs can be recouped: homeowners who upgrade their heating and cooling systems to more energy-efficient models qualify for government and utility rebates. “Programs generally provide higher incentives for products that operate at higher efficiencies and have the greatest impact on the environment,” says Marty Gaudet, chief of the EcoEnergy Retrofit – Homes Program at Natural Resources Canada. From when it was launched in 2007 to its closure in March 2012, the federal program issued grants to 369,000 Canadians who improved their heating systems.

Although the federal program has ended, there are many robust provincial and utility programs still in place that allow homeowners to save twice when making upgrades. In addition to the rebate savings, a new furnace significantly reduces heating costs. Replacing a condensing gas furnace that’s 60 per cent fuel-efficient with one rated 97 per cent efficient can save you $590 per year on energy costs. A new furnace is quieter, takes up less space and creates a more comfortable home.

To qualify for provincial or utility rebates for upgrades, you may need to book a pre-retrofit energy audit and, once your furnace or air conditioner has been installed, get a post-retrofit audit. Other programs require registration (or pre-registration) and proof of installation. Read on to find out what rebates for furnaces and air conditioners are available in your area.

Or, to see details about rebates for more heating options not listed here (programmable thermostats, geothermal, etc.), and other green home improvements, please click your province or municipality at the EcoLiving Rebates Finder.

 

What to buy

Provincial rebates

Municipal rebates

Other rebates

Air conditioner, central

  • Nfld. and Lab. $250
  • Sask. $300

  • Ont., installation of both a high-efficiency central heating system and central air conditioning, up to $650; installation of central air conditioning only, $250 or$400 depending on model, from Ontario Power Authority (Save ON Energy Heating and Cooling Incentive)

Air conditioner, window

  • Nfld. and Lab. $25-$125

Boiler

  • B.C. $500-$600
  • N.B. $750 or $900, depending type of boiler installed.
  • Nfld. and Lab. $375
  • N.W.T. $300-$1,800
  • P.E.I. up to $1,500
  • Sask. $750-$1,125
  • Y.T. $300-$600

Furnace

  • B.C. $400-$600
  • N.B. $500-$600
  • Nfld. and Lab. $375-$565
  • N.W.T. $150-$1,800,maximum two units
  • P.E.I. 15% of eligible costs, up to $1,500
  • Sask. $300-$975(maximum two units)
  • Y.T. $300-$600
  • Edmonton, $2,000(for low-income households with houses valued at less than $350,000)
  • N.S. Installation of Energy Star–qualified natural gas boilers and furnaces, $625-$2,000, from Heritage Gas
  • Ont. Installation of both a high-efficiency central heating system and central air conditioning, up to $650; installation of high-efficiency furnace only, $250, from Ontario Power Authority (Save ON Energy Heating and Cooling Incentive)

Heat pump

  • B.C. $1,000-$1,500
  • Man. up to $3,000
  • N.B. $500-$1,800
  • Nfld. and Lab. $500
  • N.W.T. up to $5,000
  • N.S. $900-$4,375
  • P.E.I. up to $1,500

  • B.C. Ground source heat pump rebate (calculated at $0.05/kWh in savings), about $900 for an average home, from Fortis BC
  • B.C. Air source heat pump,$200 per ton (or per 12,000 BTUs), about $600 for an average home, from Fortis BC
  • B.C. Ductless heat pump, $300 per ton (or per 12,000 BTUs), about $450 for an average home, from Fortis BC

Heat recovery ventilator

  • B.C. $1,000
  • N.B. $500-$1,800
  • Nfld. and Lab. $375
  • N.W.T. $150-$600(maximum two units)
  • P.E.I. 15% of eligible costs, up to $1,500
  • Que. up to $300
  • Sask. $400

Heating, geothermal /earth energy

  • N.B. up to $5,000
  • Nfld and Lab. up to $1,500
  • P.E.I. 15% of eligible costs, up to $1,500
  • N.S. $750-$2,500
  • Que. $3,300
  • Sask. up to $3,500

  • Que. A $6,375 for installing a geothermal system from Hydro-Québec.
 

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